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Music

The Music department is a successful department where students feel supported and encouraged to stretch their musical abilities, irrespective of their previous experience.

All students are taught to read staff notation from the start of year 7. Lessons are predominantly performance based at KS3, with students being taught keyboard skills, starting with melody only performances and progressing to two-handed playing throughout the key stage. Composition tasks are built into the schemes of work across the key stage, with a unit dedicated to composition in year 9.

To view the full Curriculum Maps for Music - Click Here Music Curriculum for years 7-11

Year 7

Year 7 students study schemes of work based on a ‘Song Festival’, ‘Rhythm, Pitch and Instruments’, ‘Structure and Dynamics’, and ‘Musicals and Tempo’. During these schemes of work, students learn to read treble clef staff notation, and to understand expressive directions such as dynamics and tempo markings. Students learn to analyse music in terms of its mood, instrumentation, musical changes, and its fundamental structure. Students sing as a class, perform at a year 7 Song Festival in the Autumn term and learn to play a variety of pieces on the keyboard, ranging from simple melody line pieces for those who are complete beginners, to graded two-handed pieces for those who have prior experience in keyboard or piano skills. Pieces learned to play include “Sway”, “Over the Rainbow”, “Can You Feel the Love Tonight” and “I Dreamed a Dream”. Students also complete mini projects on Great Composers linked to the units studied.

Year 8

Year 8 students study schemes of work based on ‘Caribbean Music and Metre’, ‘Baroque Music and Melody’, ‘Film Music’, and ‘Ragtime and Blues Music’. During these schemes of work, students develop their understanding of treble clef staff notation, and extend this by learning to read bass clef staff notation. Students develop their understanding of expressive directions, often thinking about how to apply these to their work themselves, with some also adding tempo changes, and techniques such as pedalling. Students develop their analysis of music, using more complex musical vocabulary to describe its mood, musical changes, and fundamental structure, and begin to consider musical context. Students sing as a class, and continue to develop their keyboard skills, with the vast majority performing two-handed pieces, either in pairs or individually. Pieces learned to play include “Three Little Birds”, “Under the Sea”, “Spring”, “Te Deum”, “Stay With Me”, “Skyfall” and “The Entertainer”. Students who receive private lessons are also given the opportunity to perform a piece of their choosing if suitable to the topic being learnt. Students also complete mini projects on Great Composers linked to the units studied.

Year 9

Year 9 students study schemes of work based on ‘20th Century Music’, ‘Song Writing’, and ‘Classical Period with Notation’. During these schemes of work, students further develop their understanding of treble and bass clef notation. All students are expected to perform assessments with 2 parts against each other, either in a pair or as a solo performance. Performance skills learnt in year 8 are further developed in year 9. In the ‘Song Writing’ unit, students are taught a basic stock chord progression on ukuleles and how a melody line fits above this progression. In pairs, they then compose their own song to perform for assessment. Students are also taught the basics on the notation software program “Sibelius 7”, preparing those students who are considering furthering their Music studies at GCSE. Pieces learned to play include “Nuvole Bianche”, “The River Flows in You”, “Fur Elise” and “Moonlight Sonata”. As in year 8, students who receive private lessons are also given the opportunity to perform a piece of their choosing if suitable to the topic being learnt. Students also complete mini projects on Great Composers linked to the units studied.

Year 10

We study the AQA syllabus for Music GCSE, which is split into 3 disciplines: Performance (30%), Composition (30%) and Listening (40%). In Performance lessons, students work on their portfolio, developing their skills on their chosen instrument and improving their performances according to the feedback given. In Composition lessons, students begin to work on a free composition which must last a minimum of 2 minutes. Students are given a variety of starting points to work from including Film Music, Jazz Riffs, 12-Bar Blues, and Minimalism. These compositions are completed in Year 11. In Theory lessons, students continue to build on their analytical skills and keyword vocabulary developed at KS3, and cover the areas of study set out by AQA, focusing on ‘Western Classical Music from 1650-1910’, ‘Popular Music’, ‘Traditional Music’ and ‘Western Classical Traditions since 1910’. We start to look at the Set Study from Area of Study 3.

Year 11

This is the final year of GCSE music following the AQA syllabus. Students continue to work on their Performance grades and complete their performance exam in the Autumn term, leaving the rest of the course to focus on their compositions and theory application. In Composition lessons, students complete work on their free composition, and also complete a 2-minute composition to a brief set by AQA, which will be based on one of the four areas of study. In Theory lessons, students continue to focus on the application of their previous knowledge to the two set works from Areas of Study 1 and 3. The two set works we focus on are “Mozart’s Clarinet Concerto in A Major, movement 3” and three tracks from Paul Simon’s album “Graceland”. Students also practise applying their knowledge to previously unheard music.

 

At Key Stages 4 and 5, these skills are successfully built upon creating a sound foundation which allows students to study GCSE and A-Level Music.

Extra-Curricular Music plays a huge role in the life of the department. It encourages cohesion between pupils of different year groups, as well as giving them a chance to be part of the wider community of the school. It also gives them opportunities for self-expression and self-development.

Many students receive individual peripatetic tuition.

If you wish to learn to play a musical instrument at school, please fill in the form below and make sure to read the BYMT Terms and Conditions beforehand

 

LEARNING A MUSICAL INSTRUMENT

If you wish to learn to play a musical instrument at school, please fill in the form below and make sure to read the BYMT Terms and Conditions beforehand.

APPLICATION FOR INSTRUMENTAL OR VOCAL MUSIC LESSONS

BYMT Terms and Conditions

 

Peripatetic Music Teachers

Mr S Barnes Piano
Mr C Dixon  Guitar
Mr M Ingleby  Piano & Keyboard
Ms M Tarlton Trumpet
Mr C Wilkes  Clarinet, Flute & Saxophone

Music Curriculum 7-11

Year 7

Year 7 students study schemes of work based on ‘Rhythm and Instruments of the Orchestra’, ‘Call & Response and Dynamics’, and ‘Musicals and Tempo’. During these schemes of work, students learn to read treble clef staff notation, and to understand expressive directions such as dynamics and tempo markings. Students learn to analyse music in terms of its mood, instrumentation, musical changes, and its fundamental structure. Students sing as a class, and learn to play a variety of pieces on the keyboard, ranging from simple melody line pieces for those who are complete beginners, to graded two-handed pieces for those who have prior experience in keyboard or piano skills. Pieces learned to play include “Sway”, “Super Trouper”, “Can You Feel the Love Tonight” and “I Dreamed a Dream”.

Year 8

Year 8 students study schemes of work based on ‘Caribbean Music and Metre, ‘Pop Ballads and Film Music’, and ‘Ragtime and Blues Music’. During these schemes of work, students develop their understanding of treble clef staff notation, and extend this by learning to read bass clef staff notation. Students develop their understanding of expressive directions, often thinking about how to apply these to their work themselves, with some also adding tempo changes, and techniques such as pedalling. Students develop their analysis of music, using more complex musical vocabulary to describe its mood, musical changes, and fundamental structure, and begin to consider musical context. Students sing as a class, and continue to develop their keyboard skills, with the vast majority performing two-handed pieces, either in pairs or individually. Pieces learned to play include “Three Little Birds”, “ Under the Sea”, “Stay With Me” and “The Entertainer”.

Year 9

Year 9 is a skills-based year. Students receive one performance lesson a fortnight, two composition lessons, and two theory lessons. In Performance lessons, students focus on the instrument of their choosing, working on both solo and ensemble performances. Students work with greater focus on expression and interpretation, as well as accuracy, building up a portfolio of performances throughout the year. In Composition lessons, students begin to create and notate their own music. Starting points for mini compositions completed throughout the year include 12-Bar Blues with improvisation, 4 chord pop song pattern, and programme music. These culminate in a 32-bar composition completed on Sibelius software at the end of the year. In Theory lessons, the focus is on basic Western classical notation understanding and skills. We develop a greater understanding of Western Classical Music 1650-1910, focusing on different styles and contexts of music, and on the use of musical vocabulary.

 

Year 10

We study the AQA syllabus for Music GCSE, which is split into 3 disciplines: Performance (30%), Composition (30%) and Listening (40%). In Performance lessons, students continue to work on their portfolio, developing their skills on their chosen instrument and improving their performances according to the feedback given. In Composition lessons, students begin to work on a free composition which must last a minimum of 2 minutes. Students are given a variety of starting points to work from including Film Music, Jazz Riffs, 12-Bar Blues, and Minimalism. These compositions are completed in Year 11. In Theory lessons, students continue to build on their keyword vocabulary, and cover the areas of study set out by AQA, focusing on ‘Popular Music’, ‘Traditional Music’ and ‘Western Classical Traditions since 1910’.

 

Year 11

This is the final year of GCSE music following the AQA syllabus. Students continue to work on their Performance grades independently throughout the year, with consistent advice and support, recording their final solo and ensemble performances during the year. In Composition lessons, students complete work on their free composition, and also complete a 2-minute composition to a brief set by AQA, which will be based on one of the four areas of study. In Theory lessons, students focus on the application of their previous knowledge to the two set works. These are Haydn’s ‘Symphony 101 in D Major, 'The Clock', movement 2’, and three tracks from The Beatles’ ‘Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band’ for students taking their GCSE in 2020 and 2021, changing to Mozart's 'Clarinet Concerto in A Major, movement 3: 'Rondo', and either three tracks from Alan Menken's 'Little Shop of Horrors' or three tracks from Paul Simon's 'Graceland' for students taking their GCSE in 2022 onwards. Students also practise applying their knowledge to previously unheard music.

Key Stage 5

Music is offered to A-Level at Chislehurst School for Girls. To begin the course, students must have at least a Grade 6 in GCSE Music, or must have successfully passed at least Grade 5 on their main instrument, plus Grade 5 ABRSM Theory.

We study the AQA syllabus for Music A-Level, which is split into 3 disciplines: Performance (35%), Composition (25%) and Listening (40%). 

Performances must be at Grade 6 level or above, and students work on these both independently and with support from their peripatetic teachers throughout the course. The final performance must be given between March - May of Year 13, and must consist of a varied programme of pieces, ideally at Grade 7 level, lasting a minimum of 10 minutes.

In Composition, students work over the two-year course to improve their skills in various compositional styles. Students work to complete a free composition that must last at least 3 and a half minutes, and also study the compositional techniques of J S Bach as evidenced in his chorale writing. In Year 13, two Bach-style chorale composition briefs are released, and students must complete these over the course of the year. Students develop a deep understanding of harmony and notation through this area of the course.

The Theory element of the course is split into various Areas of Study; we study Western Classical Traditions 1650-1910, Music for Theatre, and Contemporary Traditional Music over the two year course. Composers studied in depth include Purcell, Vivaldi, Bach, Mozart, Brahms, Chopin, Grieg, Rogers, Schonberg, Robert Brown, Shankar, Diabate, Piazzolla, Mariza, and Bellowhead. Students learn to analyse known and unknown music both aurally and through score reading in much greater depth than at GCSE, considering context and purpose as well as musical content. 

Extracurricular Opportunities

The Music Department at Chislehurst School for Girls is proud of the variety of extra-curricular opportunities on offer. There are several clubs to which all students are welcome, and we often include over 100 students in our main school concerts. Music opportunities include:

Monday lunchtime: Choir (open to all)

Tuesday lunchtime: Senior Steel Band (by invitation only) and Junior Band (open to any student who has had a term or more of instrumental lessons)

Wednesday lunchtime: Intermediate Steel band (Years 9&10) and Senior Band (open to any student who has passed Grade 3 or above in an instrument)

Wednesday after school: Composers' Corner (open to all, with a focus on GCSE and A-Level students who are working on coursework in composition)

Thursday lunchtime: Junior Steel Band (open to all)

Friday lunchtime: Chamber Choir (open to all, entry by audition) and Keyboard Club (open to all)

We also put on a school production biennially, with a fantastic production over 3 nights of High School Musical last year, as well as smaller performance opportunities such as Informal Concerts, and collaborations with external groups such as the Bromley Youth Music Trust and ArtsTrain. 

Students involved in musical extra-curricular opportunities typically perform in at least two concerts throughout the year, and also gain opportunities to go on special trips and tours. For example, we have just returned from a 5-day tour of Germany, including a performance to a very appreciative audience, as well as visits to a chocolate factory and theme park! This year we are planning a trip to see The Lion King in the West End, as well as beginning to plan our next tour abroad.

Latest Tweets

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@chsfgmusic
July 21
We’re really looking forward to today: first, providing some tunes at Year 7’s first Sports Day at CHSFG, closely followed by the Oscars coming to town for our Year 11s. A busy one, but lots of fun! 🎤🎉☀️
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@chsfgmusic
July 8
We’re busy putting together the video of MusicFest to share with you all - here are some photos of our fantastic musicians as a sneak peek! https://t.co/YpG2gEHNvT
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@chsfgmusic
July 6
Congratulations to our wonderful musicians, and a huge thank you to the staff who performed and supported MusicFest this afternoon. We are so proud of each and every performer, and can’t wait to share our concert with you soon! 🎹🎷🎸🎺🎶
View On Twitter
@chsfgmusic
July 6
It’s MusicFest Day! And although we’re sad that we couldn’t invite everyone in our school community to come and join us, even we have to admit that it’s possibly not the best day for an outdoor extravaganza…! We can’t wait to share our recorded MusicFest 2021 with you all 🎶🎹🎷
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@chsfgmusic
July 2
Wow - what a great rehearsal with Year 7 and Chamber Choir today! MusicFest is on Tuesday 6th July, and we can’t wait to perform, even if not to an audience of family and friends this time.
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@chsfgmusic
June 24
Thank you for having us! What a lovely way to spend a lunchtime in a veritable oasis of calm 😊
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@chsfgmusic
June 9
MusicFest tickets are now available! Letters are now on ParentMail, so grab your tickets, then come and join us on Tuesday 6th July for a fantastic evening of musical talent. We had a sneak peek of the Steel Pan Bands today, and it’s sounding amazing already…
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@chsfgmusic
May 29
Another brilliant opportunity for the summer with the fabulous Bromley Youth Music Trust! https://t.co/sEOeSQGl1Z
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@chsfgmusic
May 29
Anyone in the market for a fabulous musical theatre summer school? Look no further! https://t.co/gux50mCsF5
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@chsfgmusic Retweeted BYMT
May 27
Join us 24-27 August for our new summer holiday course BYMT SUMMER SOUNDS, a beginners course for children aged 6-12 to learn to play an instrument (strings, brass, keyboards, ukulele or percussion) and be part of a band! More information to to register https://t.co/SgYwfqipo3 https://t.co/EqMhwWGZy0
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@chsfgmusic
May 7
We’re looking forward to 2 more class singing sessions in our beautifully refurbished Hall today with Year 7 - it’s so lovely to finally get to hear our youngest students’ voices!
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@chsfgmusic Retweeted Royal Opera House
March 26
🦸‍ Who run the world? Girls. A burst of girl power for your Friday courtesy of 's and ! https://t.co/yeLjOv6gaI
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@chsfgmusic
March 25
Our virtual Spring Concert is nearly ready - keep an eye on the school website next week to see our fantastic musicians’ achievements this term!
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@chsfgmusic Retweeted Vaughan Fleischfresser
March 8
Music isn’t extra. Music isn’t additional. Music isn’t discretionary. Music isn’t an add on. And, music isn’t disposable. Music Education is core. It’s fundamental. It’s necessary. It’s an irreplaceable component of a holistic and meaningful education. That’s what music is.
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@chsfgmusic
February 17
Another fantastic opportunity - why not give it a try? https://t.co/T0Qhw68LMo
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@chsfgmusic Retweeted Abbey Road Studios
February 11
Ever wondered what goes into recording a soundtrack for a video game? Well, in 2019, recorded the music for a video game in Studio One with composer Taisei Iwasaki and went behind-the-scenes to find out more about the process: https://t.co/1tq52IFoKY https://t.co/ReH7bsKo73
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@chsfgmusic
February 11
Another fantastic free opportunity: sign up for some singing with the London Youth Choirs this half term - all welcome! https://t.co/6RfENaotB1
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@chsfgmusic
February 10
Wow! Year 7 really took today’s end of unit test on Structure, Dynamics, and Chords in their stride, with Charity, Emily, Imaan, Sacha, and Faith all surpassing 90%. What a fantastic effort from these girls, and a great way to end the half term!
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@chsfgmusic
February 9
Your headshot could be right here a few years from now... you can’t lose anything by trying! https://t.co/39fW4X2aXW
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@chsfgmusic
February 8
We’ve been offered an incredible opportunity for Years 10-13 students to access FREE music industry mentoring led by professional musicians through BYMT - please see the email sent to you this morning for more details. Spaces are limited, so sign up quickly!
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